Personnel

Photo of Dan Repeta.

Dan Repeta

  • Chief ScientistWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • My function on the cruise is chief scientist. I am an organic geochemistry who studies the production and fate of organic matter in seawater. On this cruise I will be collecting samples for dissolved organic nutrients- organic compounds that include phosphorus and bind trace metals, as well as small organic molecules that are consumed by bacteria. We wish to understand how these substances fuel bacteria and algae in the ocean.
Photo of Jamie Becker.

Jamie Becker

  • Graduate Student / Co-Junior Chief ScientistWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • During the cruise, I will be acting as Co-Junior Chief Scientist along with Solange Duhamel and together we’ll be helping the Chief Scientist accomplish the collective research objectives of all the scientists on board the ship. Dan Repeta, Solange and I will be working with everyone on the Melville to produce a successful research cruise. My personal research goal for this cruise is to examine the connection between small carbon compounds in the ocean known as Dissolved Organic Matter (or “DOM” for short) and marine microorganisms. I will be collecting seawater during the cruise to analyze the chemistry of DOM back in the laboratory. I will also be working in a team alongside Adrian Sharma and Jess Bryant (otherwise known as the “DOMinators”) to give concentrated DOM to microorganisms and see how they respond in incubators on board the ship. After this cruise, we hope to have a better understanding of how marine microorganisms use DOM to survive in the ocean.
Photo of Solange Duhamel.

Solange Duhamel

  • Postdoctoral Researcher / Co-Junior Chief ScientistUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa)
  • Before, during and after the cruise, Jamie Becker and I will be acting as Co-Junior Chief Scientists and will be helping the chief scientist, Dan Repeta to organize the cruise and make it a success. During the cruise, I will be particularly interested in the dynamics of phosphorus biogeochemistry and bioavailability and its link with carbon and energy cycling along our travel from the most productive to the poorest region of the world’s ocean. I will characterize the dynamics of hydrolyze and uptake of various inorganic and organic phosphorus and carbon compounds by the microbial community. I will identify the main actors of these processes using size fractionation and cell-sorting by flow cytometry. Finally, I will be working with other scientists on the cruise to better understand the cycling of organic phosphorus.
Photo of Gadiel Alarcon.

Gadiel Alarcón

  • Marine BiologistUniversidad de Concepción, Chile
  • I’m Marine Biologist from Universidad de Concepción, Chile. We’ll be working on molecular ecology and cell sorting by flow cytometry of photosynthetic picoplankton.
Photo of Nilo Alvarado.

Nilo Alvarado

  • StudentUniversity of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC)
  • I am interested in phytoplankton ecology and harmful algal bloom species. Specifically, what ecological factors contribute to changes in toxicity levels of different phytoplankton. On this cruise, I will be looking at how biogenic silica concentrations change from coastal regions to the open ocean using a novel fluorescent probe. I will also be assisting Dr. Sasha Tozzi with evaluating incubation experiments using the Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer.
Photo of Lydia Baker.

Lydia Baker

  • Graduate StudentUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa)
  • I am a biological oceanography graduate student and I am interested in studying the dynamics of diatom-bacterial interactions in the open ocean, especially at the cell-to-cell level. My work on this cruise will be to investigate how this interaction changes along the varying environmental conditions that will be encountered during Big RAPA.
Photo of Paul Berube.

Paul Berube

  • Postdoctoral AssociateMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • The Chisholm Lab will be primarily focused on examining changes in the distribution, abundance, and diversity of the marine phytoplankter, Prochlorococcus, along the strong environmental gradients between the highly productive coastal stations and the ultra-oligotrophic gyre stations. Incubation experiments in the nitrogen limited South Pacific gyre will be used to evaluate the response of Prochlorococcus populations to nitrate and ammonium additions. Our overall goal is to develop a more complete understanding of the environmental factors influencing the ecology of this important marine microbe.
Photo of Jessica Bryant.

Jessica Bryant

  • TechnicianMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • I am a member the research team DOMinator, along with Co-Junior Chief Scientist Jamie Becker and my colleague in the Delong Lab, Adrian Sharma. Seawater is filled with millions of bacterial cells. We are studying how these marine bacteria eat a naturally occurring, complex mixture of small chemicals in seawater called dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our experiments involve putting seawater, bacteria, and DOM into fancy aquariums called bioreactors and observing how the bacteria eat DOM. However, bacteria are tricky critters to study. Since they are so small, we can’t simply watch them eat DOM the way you can watch fish eat fish flakes in an aquarium. Instead, over the course of the experiment, we will be collecting bacterial cells from the bioreactors using filters. We will then take these samples back to the laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to do a CSI-like investigation using genetics to uncover what kinds of bacteria are in our bioreactors and how they are eating the DOM.
Photo of Deniz Bombar.

Deniz Bombar

  • Postdoctoral ResearcherUniversity of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC)
  • I’m a Postdoc at Jon Zehr’s lab, originally from Germany where I finished my PhD at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research. During my PhD I have done work in the South China Sea, upwelling region off Vietnam, where we quantified new production incl. nitrate uptake and nitrogen fixation during different monsoon seasons. (The Vietnamese upwelling is seasonal). I’m also interested in the identification of active diazotrophs in the ocean, and so far used nifH analyses to investigate the influence of Mekong river discharge on diazotroph activity in the South China Sea. During the Arica cruise, I will sample for DNA and RNA with Nicole Pereira, and we plan to design bottle experiments to test the short term influence of upwelling on different diazotrophs.
Photo of Tara Clemente.

Tara Clemente

  • Research AssociateUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa)
  • I am interested in studying the spatial variability in plankton size structure and community composition along biogeochemical gradients in the Ocean. On this cruise I will collect samples for the measurement of core parameters such as dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, particulate carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and silica. I will also be collaborating with Solange Duhamel on her studies regarding phosphorus biogeochemistry which will include measurements of size fractionated Chlorophyll, ATP and particulate phosphorus. I will also be helping Allison Fong with the deployment and recovery of the free-floating sediment trap array and analysis of particulates.
Photo of Sonya Dyhrman.

Sonya Dyhrman

  • Associate ScientistWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • Sonya Dyhrman is an Associate Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution where she works on marine microbial biogeochemistry. One of her primary interests is in the microbial cycling of phosphorus, and the Dyhrman group is working with others on the ship to understand the microbial cycling of organic phosphorus.
Photo of Tyler Goepfert.

Tyler Goepfert

  • Graduate StudentWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • I'm joining the cruise as a student from WHOI. I will be sampling with McLANE pumps for particulates (particular interest in proteomics), and also with a trace-metal CTD. Our lab specializes in trace metal chemistry. I also anticipate running some short-term bottle incubation experiments investigating urea, nickel, and other trace elements.
Mª Lorena González H.

Mª Lorena González H.

  • Marine BiologistUniversidad de Concepción, Chile
  • I’m Marine Biologist from Universidad de Concepción, Chile. We’ll be working on molecular ecology and cell sorting by flow cytometry of photosynthetic picoplankton.
Photo of Allison Fong.

Allison Fong

  • Graduate StudentUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa)
  • I study the microbial consortia and processes associated with open ocean marine snow. On this cruise, I will be collecting marine snow via free-floating sediment trap arrays and processing the material for bulk biogeochemical analyses and microbial diversity.
Photo of Eric Grabowski.

Eric Grabowski

  • Outreach Coordinator for BiG RAPAUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa)
  • Eric Grabowski works for C-MORE at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and leads the SEA-IT-LIVE program. Eric is passionate about communicating the importance of the ocean to the community and inspiring the next generation of oceanographers.
Photo of Bud Hale.

Bud Hale

  • Shipboard Computer Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO)
  • He is the interface between the ship’s crew and the science party. Bud mostly oversees all of the computers, digital technology and realtime data.
Photo of Sheean Haley.

Sheean Haley

  • Research Associate II Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • I am part of Sonya Dyhrman’s research group interested in the microbial cycling of phosphorus. The Dyhrman group is working with others on the ship to understand the microbial cycling of organic phosphorus.
Photo of Katherine Heal.

Katherine Heal

  • Undergraduate StudentColorado College
  • Katherine Heal is a senior at Colorado College in Colorado Springs, majoring in Environmental Chemistry. Katherine has previously worked as a research fellow at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and has done field work in Costa Rica.
Photo of Daniela Honorato.

Daniela Honorato

  • Undergraduate StudentUniversidad de Valparaíso, Chile
  • I’m a undergraduate student of Marine Biology at the University of Valparaíso, Chile. I’m on the cruise working as a chilean observer and I am also doing an internship for my undergraduate studies. Thank you all very much for letting me be a part of this awesome experience!
Photo of Joe C. Jennings, Jr.

Joe C. Jennings, Jr.

  • Sr. Faculty Research AssistantOregon State University (OSU) – COAS
  • Joe has spent 30 years as a chemical oceanography technician at Oregon State University, providing analytical chemistry support to a wide variety of PIs and programs, but with a specialty in the analysis of inorganic nutrients in seawater. Over course of his career, he has spent more than 4 years at sea on various research cruises.
Photo of Rick Kayser.

Rick Kayser

  • Research SpecialistMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • I'm a research specialist and work for Prof. Ed Boyle in the Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at MIT. My function on the cruise will be to maintain our sampling systems, which are called VANES. We will be studying the Fe distribution across the cruise crack.
Photo of Jong-Mi Lee.

Jong-Mi Lee

  • Graduate StudentMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • I am a graduate student at MIT. My C-MORE cruise objective is to understand how iron (Fe) biogeochemistry changes from the upwelling zone to the gyre. On the cruise, I will collect seawater samples for soluble Fe and dissolved Fe concentrations, Fe isotopes, and Fe-binding organic ligands.
Photo of Ricardo M. Letelier.

Ricardo Letelier

  • ProfessorOregon State University (OSU)
  • My main research interest is to understand how marine microbes, microbial populations and communities respond to short and long-term environmental changes and how these changes, in turn, affect the productivity of the oceans. During this cruise I will collaborate with students and colleagues in studying how the distribution of nutrients, oxygen and light affect the abundance and diversity of microbes while we travel from one of the most productive oceanic regions in the world, the upwelling regions off Peru and Northern Chile, into one of the most barren, the Central South Pacific gyre.
Photo of Dawn Moran.

Dawn Moran

  • TechnicianWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • I am a member of Mak Saito's research team. Our main focus on this cruise is to correlate trace metal chemistry with plankton biology. We collect trace metal samples with special equipment that has been extensively cleaned. Concentrations of iron. cobalt, manganese and zinc will be measured from these samples. Plankton will be collected onto 142mm filters with pumps that can filter hundreds of liters of seawater. Protein will be extracted from these filters. The combination of these two sampling methods allows us to show correlations between the oceans chemistry and the types of proteins that are expressed by plankton specific to the sampling area.
Photo of Cristina Andrea Carrasco Montes.

Cristina Andrea Carrasco Montes

  • Graduate StudentUniversidad de Concepción, Chile
  • I am oceanographer and master’s student in oceanography at the Universidad de Concepción, Chile. T he objectives of the cruise are to take samples of gases along the transect to see fluxes and distribution in deep, and also make some experiments to see the uptake of nitrogen.
Photo of Mar Nieto-Cid.

Mar Nieto-Cid

  • Postdoctoral ResearcherInstituto de Investigaciones Marinas - CSIC, Spain
  • After a 3-year postdoc at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution I continue to develop my scientific research at the Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas - CSIC in Vigo, Spain. My focus is the dissolved organic matter, and during this cruise I will collect samples to determine the distribution of the dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen. At the same time I will measure the fluorescence and absorbance of this material aboard the R/V Melville, to trace labile and refractory organic matter and to study the colour of the different water masses of this area.
Photo of Nicole Pereira.

Nicole Pereira

  • Graduate StudentUniversity of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC)
  • I am a graduate student at UCSC studying marine microbiology and am interested in nutrient limitation in diazotrophs. On this cruise, I will be sampling along the cruise track to identify various populations of nitrogen-fixing organisms, using molecular techniques. I will also be setting up incubations along with Deniz Bombar, in order to study upwelling effects on these organisms. I plan to use these samples to look at responses to nutrient limitation via gene expression in diazotrophs.
Photo of Shimi Rii.

Shimi Rii

  • Graduate StudentUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa)
  • My cruise objective is to determine the role of gradients in controlling plankton community structure. My primary goal is to investigate the abundance and diversity of picophytoeukaryotes (0.2-2 um), using the combination of flow cytometry, HPLC, and molecular approaches. In addition, I will be collecting samples for bacterioplankton (bacteria and Archaea) abundance and diversity as well as net tow and microscopy slide samples for microplankton diversity.
Photo of Keith Shadle.

Keith Shadle

  • Shipboard Technical Support Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO)
  • His job is to ensure that all deck scientific operations are safely conducted and get completed in a timely manner. He is also the interface between the ship’s crew and the science party.
Photo of Adrian Sharma.

Adrian Sharma

  • Postdoctoral AssociateMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • My experiment studies how bacterial cells eat the enormous pool of small chemicals present in seawater called dissolved organic matter (DOM). In collaboration with the Co-Junior Chief Jamie Becker and my DeLong lab colleague Jess Bryant, we will obtain a large amount of DOM from the ocean and then add this pure DOM to regular seawater to feed the bacteria naturally present in the ocean. During the feeding process our team will monitor bacterial activity to see who is there (which types of bacteria) and how they eat the DOM (what kind of biological machinery is used). The main goal is to understand how bacteria consume nutrients in the ocean and how their activity across the world causes changes in the sea, air and land around us.
Photo of Daniel Tabersky.

Daniel Tabersky

  • Graduate StudentWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • I’m joining the cruise as a student from WHOI and as a member of the Saito lab for Marine bioinorganic chemistry. I will be sampling with McLANE pumps for particulates and with a trace-metal CTD. In particular, I am interested in N2O and Nitrate samples.
Photo of Craig Taylor.

Craig Taylor

  • Associate ScientistWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
  • A microbiologist by training, one interest I’ve had has been the integration of technology with microbiological tracer incubation technique to accurately assess the activities of microbes and the influence of environmental physic-chemical conditions on those activities. On this cruise I will be deploying two new robotic micro-laboratories called the Incubating Productivity Systems (IPS) for conducting in situ time series measurements of phytoplankton primary production for correlation with other studies being undertaken on this cruise. The devices will be placed at chosen depths within the euphotic zone and allowed to drift free of the ship on a spar float system for the duration of the ship’s stay at the 3 process stations.
Photo of Jesse Thompson.

Jesse Thompson

  • Graduate StudentMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • I study photosynthesis in the oceans, specifically, the life of a tiny green bacterium called Prochlorococcus. On this cruise, I’m excited about trying to grow new strains of Prochlorococcus from the wild (it’s like gardening, but with test tubes full of seawater and nutrients instead of dirt). I’ll also be collecting samples for single cell genomics, a new technique that lets us look at the DNA of microbes from the environment one cell at a time. This lets us find out how different two cells are from each other and from the Prochlorococcus growing in the lab that we already know and love, and it also lets us see details of evolution, like how even closely related cells are specialized for different things.
Photo of Sasha Tozzi.

Sasha Tozzi

  • MEGAMER Postdoctoral ResearcherUniversity of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC)
  • My science interests include phytoplankton ecology and photophysiology, marine primary production; environmental forcing and regulation of phytoplankton biomass and production; photosynthesis biophysics with a main interest in studies based on fluorescence bioassays. On this cruise I plan to explore the effects of nutrients and pCO2 with experiment designed to simulate and compare present ocean condition to conditions forecasted for one hundred years from now on South Pacific phytoplankton assemblages’ photosynthesis, using large volume (20 L) incubators and new multispectral Fast Repetition Fluorometers (FRRF). I will also survey photosynthetic quantum yield along the cruise track and on CTD profiles.
Photo of Jeanett Vera.

Jeanett Vera

  • Graduate StudentUniversidad de Concepción, Chile
  • Has a BS degree in Marine Biology and is working towards her Ph.D in chemical oceanography at the University of Concepción, Chile. Her studies focus on the distribution and metabolism of fungi in the ocean
Photo of Elisha M. Wood-Charlson .

Elisha M. Wood-Charlson

  • Postdoctoral ResearcherUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
  • I am a postdoctoral researcher with C-MORE through UH Manoa. During this cruise, I will study how viral communities changes across strong environmental gradients. This includes looking at the per cent of host cells infected, viral production and decay rates, and how addition of nutrients affects these dynamics. Upon return to UH, I will process samples to measure viral diversity using genetic sequencing and genome analysis. This is my first major research cruise, and I am very excited to be at sea for 30 days!
Photo of Angel White.

Angel White

  • Assistant ProfessorOregon State University (OSU)
  • My research will focus on understanding the production and degradation of organic matter along the cruise transect. This work will focus specifically on nitrogen and phosphorus cycling and will be in collaboration with other C-MORE team members.

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